Byron's Babbles

Serving Instead Of Putting On A Show

So, let’s see here; if we are constantly looking up to make sure our boss is seeing and approving of us or bragging about what we’ve done, we’re probably paying less attention to the people we’re now leading or worse yet, our customers. If your organization follows a traditional hierarchy, which most unfortunately still seem too, attention will naturally shift up — be directed up the hierarchy. Ever been a part of an organization where there always seem to be the favorites, you must make sure those high on the hierarchy are hearing every great thing you do, or having to make sure you’ve bragged on those high on the hierarchy? It’s not a good place to be.

In Simple Truth #3, Servant Leaders Turn The Traditional Pyramid Upside Down, in Simple Truths of Leadership: 52 Ways To Be A Servant Leader and Build Trust, Making Common Sense Common Practice we are told by Ken Blanchard and Randy Conley that great leaders turn the hierarchy over and make those closest to the customer the top of the organizational pyramid. For example, in a school, this would put the teachers at the top of the pyramid. In this model, the principal serves the teachers. Let me tell you from experience, this works. What this ultimately does is place the customer (in my example, the student) at the top of our organizations. This really shifts us to an intent-based leadership model where everyone is a leader. Then, everyone is serving.

One Response

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  1. Jewish Young Professional "JYP" said, on January 31, 2022 at 7:52 am

    I think there is a lot to be said for the idea of leaders working to better than people “under them” in the organizational hierarchy. Great leaders support their direct reports and create growth opportunity. I think it can be difficult to put the leaders as servants model in place in practice. There are so many stakeholders – parents, students, teachers, for example – and at some point, it is impossible to service all of them and also keep an eye out on long-term strategy.
    I enjoyed this post and think it is good food for thought.

    Like


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