Byron's Babbles

From Best Practice To Next Practice

IMG_2336Today was the final day of the 2nd Annual Global Smart Manufacturing Summit in Berlin, Germany. I really valued the time to get to know business and industry leaders from around the world. I was reminded of what my good friend Kevin Eikenberry and I used to talk about a lot – when we look at the differences between different industries (eg. manufacturing vs. education), we see about 90-95% of our issues being the same and about 5-10% different. What I mean here is that many of the challenges and roads to improvement are the same. Think about it, we all have responsibility in finance, HR, facilities, and customers. If we break that down further, we all have one of the same groups within the customer category – employees. Now, I get it; our employees are our competitive advantage, but employees are still a customer to be taken care of at the highest level.

Organizational Commitment

The first session this morning was about initiatives and organizational commitment. As a believer in learning organizations, I was really enamored by the discussion of organizational commitment. This thinking really fits with a lot of the Gallup® research I have been studying around employee engagement. When we discuss organizational commitment, we are talking about the bond employees experience with their organization. Broadly speaking, we know employees who are committed to their organization generally feel a connection with their organization, feel that they fit in, and believe they understand the goals of their organization.

Screen Shot 2018-04-10 at 8.25.16 PMNext Practice

One of the session titles this morning was “From Best Practice To Next Practice.” I really appreciated this session because we talk a lot in education about “best practices,” but really it is about making the right choice and implementing the next practice. Good or bad, I tend to be the one looking for the next practices. Really, that is what this entire discussion was about for the global leaders here: what are the next practices.

Convergence

Then, it comes down to convergence. How do we take several sources of independent data and bring them together to develop strong conclusions? In education we call this using “multiple data points.” I don’t think we do the best job of bringing all the data points together. For example, this week I was reading and article about teacher pay and how it was decreasing. I question if we have been properly converging HR, financial planning, and student data in a way that would inform what we have been paying our teachers in Indiana. I’ll let you grapple with my comment here, but you get the point.

Problems

One of the comments that I loved most today was, “We shouldn’t be talking about the problems of today, but the problems of tomorrow.” This is so true! This means in education we need to be looking several years out as to what business and industry needs. We also need to think about what our execution model will be for making sure our students have the skills necessary to meet the needs of the workforce. A few phrases/questions coming from the global manufacturing leaders that jumped out at me were:

  • What data is coming from where?
  • How do you use your data?
  • Appropriate levels of (you fill in the blank here)
  • Move from reactive to predictive and preventative

Outcomes

All of this discussion has made me an hinkeven bigger believer in us (both Indiana and the United States) needing to move to a strictly outcomes based school accountability system. We could then, truly in partnership with business/industry and higher education, determine what transferable skills students need and have coming out of high school. Then we can match those transferable skills to outcomes that the students needs to accomplish. Here are some examples and outcomes:

  • industry certifications
  • 4 year degrees
  • Associate degrees
  • Trade school
  • Joining the military
  • Meaningful employment

At a time when our state has 75,000 jobs per year going unfilled because there are not skilled workers to take those jobs, we need to be thinking about the outcomes for our students. Thus the skills gap of only 42% having any kind of post-secondary preparedness versus the 75% needed.

If we are going to have our students ready for the workforce we will need to:

  • Teach students in a real world and relevant context
  • Enable, encourage, and stimulate students to be curious
  • Teach students how to fail and that it is o.k. to fail
  • Engage students in career exploration activities at a young age
  • Determine the transferable skills needed to have students ready for today’s jobs
  • Teach students to be disruptors
  • Provide pre-apprenticeship, apprenticeship, and work based learning internships

Business and Industry engagement in education programs not only prepares students with the skills they need for careers, but it also contributes to the development of clearly developed career pathways that lead students to careers after graduation.

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2 Responses

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  1. Marios Mitrosilis said, on April 19, 2018 at 9:59 am

    Dear Byron, it was great meeting you in Berling!
    I really admire your passion and the work you are doing in preparing the future education for the next generations in Indiana! I wish my country did the same!

    One small detail I noticed, “Move from reactive to predictive and preventative”
    The word that was used was “prescriptive” and not “preventative”.
    Things already work in preventative mode. We replace parts after X operating hours, whether damaged or not in order to prevent downtime and accidents (this is very common i.e. in airplanes).
    Predictive means that I analyse current behaviour and I can change things when data predicts failure in the next X amount of operating hours.
    Prescriptive takes one step further and initialises the whole sequence.

    There is a good analysis of the differences in this blog post: https://www.ibm.com/blogs/internet-of-things/maintenance-evolution-prescriptive/

    Like

  2. […] From Best Practice To Next Practice […]

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